• South America
  • 30 Things No One Tells You About Backpacking in South America

    30 things nobody told us about before we went backpacking in South America!

    We spent 4 months backpacking in South America. Although each of the countries we visited was as unique and different from one another as can be, we did notice a few universal truths about backpacking in South America… things nobody told us about before we left. In no particular order and in various degrees of usefulness, we’ve compiled our observations into this list of 30 things no one tells you about backpacking in South America!

  • Accommodation Reviews
  • Hostels in Colombia: Where to Stay … & Where NOT to Stay!

    The hostels in Colombia are some of the best in South America. But which hostels should you stay in, and which should you skip? We went backpacking in Colombia for a month. These are our best Colombian hostel recommendations.

    During our month of backpacking, we slept in a LOT of beds in Colombia, and stayed at at a LOT of different hostels. From cramped party hostels to isolated hilltop retreats, it seemed like no two hostels in Colombia were the same. To make things easier for you, dear reader, we’ve come up with the best list of hostels in Colombia: where to stay, and where NOT to stay!

  • Booze Travel
  • Argentina Wine Tasting & Ridiculous History with Mendoza Wine Camp

    Wine Tasting in Mendoza, Argentine with Mendoza Wine Camp. Learn about ridiculous history and drink a TON of wine on this fantastic tour of the Lujan de Cuyo wine valley!

    On our first day in Mendoza, while tasting 21 wines, paired with 9 carefully matched courses of food, and touring 4 gorgeous wineries, we may have accidentally fallen (or drunkenly tripped) head over heels for wine! But surprisingly, it wasn’t the copious wine or the amazing food that made this tour one-of-a-kind. It was a sort of quirky, twisted historical edge that we’ve never encountered before in a wine tour.

  • Booze Travel
  • Learning to Make Ceviche and Pisco Sours with Lima Gourmet

    Ceviche and Pisco Sours: we have Peru to thank for these two iconic South American creations. So during our visit to Lima, we were thrilled to discover Lima Gourmet’s classic Ceviche and Pisco Sour cooking class. In one short hour, we went from boring average Americans to masters of Peruvian cooking! Lima Gourmet’s class is fun, easy, and affordable: we think it’s an absolute must-do when visiting Lima.

  • Hiking
  • Hiking Machu Picchu: Failure on The Inca Trail

    Hiking Machu Picchu in Peru

    We’re sitting in a restaurant in Aguas Calientes. Around us are five couples, two solo travelers, and two tour guides. All fourteen of them are tired, dirty, and covered in dried sweat. They just finished the 4-day Inca Trail to Machu Picchu and experienced a life changing experience, one that brought them together as a family to experience a once in a lifetime physical and mental challenge. As we watch them drinking celebratory beer, retelling stories, and soaking it all in, I’m reminded: this was supposed to be us. But instead of having a spiritual pilgrimage to Machu Picchu, we had an expensive failure on the Inca Trail.

  • South America
  • Baños, Ecuador: A Complete Guide to What to Do in Baños

    Swinging above the trees on the Swing at the End of the World, at Casa Arbol in Baños, Ecuador!

    Baños, Ecuador was one of our favorite places on our entire 4-month trip to South America and we would go back again in a heartbeat. The town is situated in a valley at the base of an active volcano. It’s unique location is in the perfect spot to take advantage of the varied environment, complete with mountains, rivers, waterfalls, and hot springs. The town is known for two things: naturally heated thermal baths – the namesake of Baños, Ecuador – and its many adventure opportunities! Here’s our complete guide to what to do in Baños.

  • South America
  • 13 Things to Know Before You Go to Cusco and Machu Picchu, Peru

    Hiking Machu Picchu in Peru

    Jeremy and I are less than a week away from the biggest challenge of our entire trip: hiking the 4-day Inca Trail to Machu Picchu. It’s not just the lack of Netflix and Instagram for four days that scares us (although … shudder) but the incredibly difficult high-altitude hike. This morning I walked down the street in Cusco and it felt like walking through sand… on the moon. Yikes. We’ve been searching high and low for tips about visiting Machu Picchu that will help us to feel less terrified and more excited. And one of my amazing friends went above and beyond! Angela is a brilliant lawyer who also happens to be Peruvian, and she’s been visiting Peru regularly for years. Who could be better to get Machu Picchu tips from??

  • South America
  • The Kennedy Park Cats: Cat Lover’s Paradise in Lima, Peru

    There are fluffy Siamese cats. Old ginger cats. Feisty cats. Shy cats. Cats that love attention. Cats that just want to stretch out in the sun and nap. There is every variety of cat. We felt like Willa Wonka when he first walks into the chocolate factory: all around us were THE BEST THINGS and we wanted to touch them all, but we weren’t sure we were allowed to (this park is, after all, the property of the Kennedy Park cats). Plus, one time I went to a cat cafe in Oakland and the poor over-stimulated kitties lashed out at me. Literally – I got a claw through the hand just from walking too close to them. It’s the cat equivalent of turning into a giant blueberry and rolling away: the reward isn’t worth the risk.

  • South America
  • 40 Things Nobody Tells You About Backpacking in Peru

    A supermarket aisle in Arequipa filled with Inca Kola. Peru is obsessed with Inca Kola! It's one of the things nobody told us about backpacking in Peru!

    If you’re going backpacking in Peru, chances are you’ll hear a lot about Macchu Picchu, something like “don’t spend any time in Lima” (we disagree), and some generic advice about acclimating in Cusco for a few days before doing anything athletic, like getting out of bed or walking up a flight of stairs (we agree). And that’s about it. We arrived in Peru with very little idea of what to expect. After a month of backpacking in Peru and figuring it out as we went, we’ve cobbled together some observations from our very gringo perspective, with varying levels of usefulness and in no particular order.